Beijing Dawangjing CBD Concept Master Plan

Beijing Dawangjing CBD Concept Master Plan
Beijing Dawangjing CBD Concept Master Plan
Beijing Dawangjing CBD Concept Master Plan

Focused on culture, community, and environmental conservation, this mixed-use master plan envisions a new global gateway for Beijing.

Project Facts
  • Design Finish Year 2011
  • Size Site Area: 1,050,000 square meters Building Gross Area: 1,600,000 square meter
Project Facts
  • Design Finish Year 2011
  • Size Site Area: 1,050,000 square meters Building Gross Area: 1,600,000 square meter

Creating a new landmark district

Strategically positioned between central Beijing and the Capital International Airport, this proposed high-density, mixed-use district would become a new global gateway for China’s capital city. The plan, to be built in phases, calls for landmark offices and residential towers, cultural venues, and open space, and a new bridge linking to a vibrant arts community.


Improving the public realm, expanding the parks system

In response to pressing demands to reduce carbon emissions and protect natural resources, SOM’s scheme features a “sustainable engine” in the form of a central park with a geo-thermal exchange to help passively heat and cool the district.

SOM’s concept sets a goal for 80 percent of resident and worker travel to be made by public transit, bicycle, or foot. Proposed transit stations on the M15 subway line will enable quick and convenient access to the airport, while a comprehensive network of bike lanes will reduce automobile traffic and congestion. Additionally, a streetcar system will link all districts together.


Foregrounding water conservation

The master plan proposes one of the world’s most visible examples of water conservation within an urban environment. Preliminary calculations estimate that the plan, if implemented, would have the potential to reduce district-wide water consumption by up to 500,000,000 liters per year.

Additionally, by utilizing a new Central Park as a resource for geothermal exchange, the plan passively heats and cools a significant percentage of district buildings and reduces the need for water-consuming cooling towers. This could decrease water consumption as much as fifty percent compared to conventional urban districts.