7 World Trade Center

7wtc
7wtc
7wtc

Completed in 2006, this 52-story office tower signaled the rebirth of the Lower Manhattan following the September 2001 attacks and set a standard for the World Trade Center master plan.

Project Facts
  • Status Construction Complete
  • Completion Year 2006
  • Design Finish Year 2002
  • Size Site Area: 1.26 acres Building Height: 741 feet Number of Stories: 52 Building Gross Area: 1,681,115
  • Awards
    2006, American Architecture Award, Chicago Athenaeum 2006, Award of Merit, New York Construction 2007, Special Jury Award, MIPIM 2006, Best Use of Slag Cement for Strength, Slag Cement Association 2007, Lumen Award of Excellence, Illuminating Engineering Society of North America - New York Section 2007, Innovation in Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding, Society for Environmental Graphic Design 2006, Design Award: Citation, AIA – New York State 2005, MASterworks Award: Best New Building, Municipal Art Society of New York 2007, International Illumination Design Award: Paul Waterbury Award for Outdoor Light, Illuminating Engineering Society of North America 2006, Merit Award for Architecture, AIA – New York City Chapter
  • Sustainability Certifications LEED BD+C CS (Core & Shell) Gold, BD+C, Gold
  • Collaborators
    Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design, Inc. Jaros, Baum & Bolles Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers Philip Habib & Associates James Carpenter Design Associates, Inc. Pentagram WSP Cantor Seinuk Jenny Holzer Ken Smith Workshop Ducibella Venter & Santore Rudell & Associates, Inc. Cerami & Associates Tishman Construction Corporation University Of Illinois
Project Facts
  • Status Construction Complete
  • Completion Year 2006
  • Design Finish Year 2002
  • Size Site Area: 1.26 acres Building Height: 741 feet Number of Stories: 52 Building Gross Area: 1,681,115
  • Awards
    2006, American Architecture Award, Chicago Athenaeum 2006, Award of Merit, New York Construction 2007, Special Jury Award, MIPIM 2006, Best Use of Slag Cement for Strength, Slag Cement Association 2007, Lumen Award of Excellence, Illuminating Engineering Society of North America - New York Section 2007, Innovation in Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding, Society for Environmental Graphic Design 2006, Design Award: Citation, AIA – New York State 2005, MASterworks Award: Best New Building, Municipal Art Society of New York 2007, International Illumination Design Award: Paul Waterbury Award for Outdoor Light, Illuminating Engineering Society of North America 2006, Merit Award for Architecture, AIA – New York City Chapter
  • Sustainability Certifications LEED BD+C CS (Core & Shell) Gold, BD+C, Gold
  • Collaborators
    Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design, Inc. Jaros, Baum & Bolles Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers Philip Habib & Associates James Carpenter Design Associates, Inc. Pentagram WSP Cantor Seinuk Jenny Holzer Ken Smith Workshop Ducibella Venter & Santore Rudell & Associates, Inc. Cerami & Associates Tishman Construction Corporation University Of Illinois

A step towards the future

As the first building erected at the World Trade Center site since September 11, 2001, and with the site’s master plan then still in the works, 7 World Trade Center established a vision for the future of the district. It set a new benchmark for environmental performance as one of New York City’s first highly sustainable office towers, and transformed the public realm by restoring the Manhattan street grid and reconnecting the surrounding neighborhoods for the first time in three decades.

7wtc
© David Sundberg | Esto

Creative illumination

Light is at the heart of the building’s design. The tower rises like a shimmering glass shard, with a curtain wall that reflects the ever-changing sky. At street level, the podium is clad in a perforated steel screen created in collaboration with artist James Carpenter. Behind the metal scrim sits a panel of blue and white LEDs whose intensity gradually shifts throughout the day. In the spacious lobby, a captivating light installation by the artist Jenny Holzer draws the attention of passers-by.

7wtc
© David Sundberg | Esto

Restoring Greenwich Street

In the 1970s, the construction of the original 7 World Trade Center erased a large portion of Greenwich Street from the map. As an important corridor on the lower west side, the street had linked several neighborhoods, from Tribeca to Battery Park. In 2002, SOM convinced the developer of the new 7 World Trade Center, Silverstein Properties, to build on a smaller footprint than before—therefore giving up a significant amount of the available floor-area ratio. The slimmer building made way for the resurrection of Greenwich Street, knitting downtown neighborhoods back together. What’s more, it created space for a triangular park across from the building that provides views and natural light.

7wtc
© David Sundberg | Esto

Setting a sustainability standard

The desire to create model for sustainability guided the design process at every turn—the structural steel is recycled, the building is insulated, rainwater is reused, and ample natural light reduces electricity use. Each of these strategies and more made 7 World Trade Center the first commercial office building in the world to achieve LEED-C/S Gold certification.

Over the next 15 years, the design not only influenced the aesthetic and material choices of the World Trade Center’s future towers, but also—through SOM’s sustainable, people-oriented, and civic-minded approach—helped to establish the values that would guide the revitalization of the symbolic, emotionally charged site.

Its innovations would be incorporated into every subsequent Trade Center tower – and towers built around the globe.

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