Foshan Lingnan Tiandi Master Plan

Foshan Lingnan Tiandi Master Plan
Foshan Lingnan Tiandi Master Plan
Foshan Lingnan Tiandi Master Plan

Project Facts
  • Design Finish Year 2008
  • Size Site Area: 150 hectares Building Gross Area: 1,500,000 square meters
  • Awards
    2009, MIPIM Future Project Award: Regeneration and Master Planning, Commended, MIPIM/Architectural Review 2019, Asia Pacific Awards for Excellence, Urban Land Institute (ULI) 2009, Merit Award, AIA California 2009, Honor Award, AIA San Francisco 2009, Institute Honor Award for Regional and Urban Design, American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2009, American Architecture Award, Chicago Athenaeum 2008, Merit Award, AIA – Hong Kong Chapter
  • Sustainability Certifications LEED ND Gold, ND, Gold
  • Collaborators
    Christopher Grubbs Studio SOM | Shanghai Ben Wood Studio Guangzhou Planning Institute (Local Planning Consultant)
Project Facts
  • Design Finish Year 2008
  • Size Site Area: 150 hectares Building Gross Area: 1,500,000 square meters
  • Awards
    2009, MIPIM Future Project Award: Regeneration and Master Planning, Commended, MIPIM/Architectural Review 2019, Asia Pacific Awards for Excellence, Urban Land Institute (ULI) 2009, Merit Award, AIA California 2009, Honor Award, AIA San Francisco 2009, Institute Honor Award for Regional and Urban Design, American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2009, American Architecture Award, Chicago Athenaeum 2008, Merit Award, AIA – Hong Kong Chapter
  • Sustainability Certifications LEED ND Gold, ND, Gold
  • Collaborators
    Christopher Grubbs Studio SOM | Shanghai Ben Wood Studio Guangzhou Planning Institute (Local Planning Consultant)

Foshan, the third largest city in Guangdong Province, is renowned as one of China’s leading centers of art and scholarship. It also is home to Foshan Zumiao, the 900-year-old Song Dynasty Ancestral Temple, which sits at the heart of Donghuali Old Town. Like other historic areas in the country, this district has been threatened by unremitting high-rise development.

SOM’s plan identifies ways to conserve the ancient quarters while simultaneously creating a sustainable, modern central district able to accommodate growth. Shaped through a series of meetings with planners, developers, and city officials, the scheme proposes private development outside of the historic core. Guidelines establish density levels that could support a transit-oriented, mixed-use downtown while defraying the cost of preserving and restoring Old Town and its cherished temple. The plan outlines a range of sensitively scaled building heights, as well as walkable blocks to encourage pedestrian activity.